DC Building-Scale Microgrid Platform

DC Building-Scale Microgrid Platform
Abstract: 

CLTC is partnering with Bosch to demonstrate the Bosch Direct Current Building-Scale Microgrid Platform (DCBMP) at an American Honda Motor Co., Inc. warehouse facility. Bosch will demonstrate the effectiveness of the DCBMP, a commercial-scale DC building microgrid that integrates advanced technologies to provide reliable power to the connected loads, resilience during grid outages, increased building energy efficiency and renewable energy utilization.

The Bosch DCBMP architecture maximizes the use of solar photovoltaic (PV) generated electricity in the DC microgrid by eliminating the need for conversion equipment needed in AC-based systems. This makes the overall system more reliable, reduces the maintenance costs for the entire system, and provides a built-in mechanism for islanding critical DC loads during grid outages without the need for switching. By transitioning the majority of a building’s AC loads to a DC microgrid, a commercial customer can expect up to 30% lower total cost of ownership, higher reliability and optimized utilization of renewable generation.

CLTC will assist Bosch to design the lighting system used in the DCBMP. Following the installation and commissioning of the DCBMP, CLTC will assist in collecting performance data to document the cost savings, energy efficiency gains and the system functionality. From the results of this project, CLTC will develop a cost-effective, best-practice design and engineering approach for implementing DC microgrid systems in commercial and industrial applications.  A training program for building inspectors and electrical installers will be established to support the implementation of DCBMP systems.

The project aims to enhance technical understanding of implementation, integration and optimization methods associated with distributed renewable energy generation within California’s distribution infrastructure; pave the way for introduction and large-scale adoption of cost-effective and energy-efficient DC power distribution architectures; and establish an effective supply chain for system integration.

This project is funded through the California Energy Commission’s Electric Program Investment Charge (EPIC) Program. This project will run through March 2018.

Principal Investigator: Michael Siminovitch​

Staff Contact

Nicole Graeber, LC

Senior Development Engineer
(530) 747-3847