Outdoor

Liberty Lighting Guidelines for Zero Net Energy Communities

Liberty Lighting Guidelines for Zero Net Energy Communities
08/18/2015

CLTC is partnering with Liberty to create a zero net energy community in West Sacramento along the Sacramento River. The Liberty Lighting Guide provides design and technical specifications, application of directives, as well as Title 24 code compliance requirements for residential, outdoor, private community clubhouses, K – 8 schools, private clubhouses, neighborhood commercial spaces, parks, greenbelts, trails, sports, and recreation centers.

Part 1 with Michael Siminovitch from the CLTC: Exploring the Urban Fabrics of Light

02/26/2015

Echelon IIoT Insights Blog—In part 1 of this discussion,  Michael Siminovitch, Director of the California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC) and the Rosenfeld Chair in Energy Efficiency and a professor in the Department of Design at UC Davis, talks about adaptive outdoor lighting and the urban fabrics of light. 

Read the discussion on Echelon's IIoT Insights Blog.

2013 Title 24, Part 6 Outdoor Lighting Guide

2013 Title 24, Part 6 Outdoor Lighting Guide
02/24/2015

The California Lighting Technology Center’s 2013 Outdoor Lighting Guide for Title 24, Part 6 compliance is designed to help builders, lighting industry professionals, and others navigate the nonresidential outdoor lighting portion of California’s Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The new standards, which took effect July 1, 2014, include updated requirements for retrofit standards, lighting controls, and uplight and glare limits.

CLTC Helped To Successfully Commercialize Next-Generation Sensor

Published: Thu, 12/11/2014

The commercialization of Echelon's Lumewave MWX-LVE long-range outdoor microwave sensor illustrates CLTC's success in supporting advanced sensors for adaptive outdoor applications.

CLTC demonstrated and supported the next-generation sensor, which detects movement and can distinguish between slow and fast moving objects such as pedestrians, cyclists and motorized vehicles. The sensor reacts to the size of objects from longer distances, automatically raising the light levels to high output when the areas are occupied and lowering them when areas are vacant.

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