Adaptive

LED Linear Retrofit Solutions and Advanced Lighting Control Systems for Small Commercial Retail Applications

Linear fluorescent lamps account for 83 percent of installed lamps in the California commercial sector per a lighting market characterization performed in 2014. LED lighting products are receiving attention for their potential to replace fluorescent lighting, reduce energy use and improve lighting quality in a variety of indoor commercial applications, including offices, classrooms and retail stores. LED alternatives to linear fluorescent lighting products fall into three main categories: linear retrofit lamp solutions, linear retrofits for troffers and dedicated luminaires.

Solar panels, special lighting could save Woodland schools big money

01/28/2014

KCRA— Woodland Joint Unified School District has installed solar canopies with energy-efficient adaptive lighting at 10 sites throughout the district. The project is expected to save the district thousands of dollars annually in electricity costs while drastically reducing carbon emissions and serving as an example for other school districts focused on improving sustainability and the cost-effectiveness of district operations.

Smart Lighting Initiative: Phase 2

Published: Tue, 09/17/2013
Smart Lighting Phase 2 in 43 buildings

Phase 2 of the UC Davis Smart Lighting Initiative will upgrade lighting in offices, labs, classrooms, corridors, and other spaces in selected buildings built in 1985 or later. Implementation of energy-efficient light sources, vacancy sensors and lighting control systems will reduce energy use by an estimated 5.5 million kilowatt-hours annually, saving the campus about $475,000, according to Scott Arntzen, senior project manager with Design and Construction Management.

LD+A Research Matters: Eyes on the Road

08/01/2013

LD+A – CLTC researchers incorporated passive infrared (PIR) occupancy sensors and networked controls into a test set of dimmable LED roadway fixtures. The adaptive street lighting system yielded energy savings 27 to 42 percent greater than when the fixtures operated at a static level. All occupants, 100 percent, were detected by the PIR occupancy sensor selected for field testing, whether they were traveling on foot, by bicycle, on a motorcycle, or in an automobile.

Case Study: UC Davis Exterior Lighting Retrofit

06/01/2009

Most parking garages use high intensity discharge light sources that operate continuously regardless of lighting needs. These facilities typically do not employ energy-saving control strategies such as daylighting or time clock scheduling, and no considerations are made for lighting control based on occupancy. Garage lighting, designed to only a single static level, wastes energy and contributes to peak demand during the day and light pollution at night.

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