Adaptive

PIER Solutions for Classrooms and Conference Rooms

11/01/2009

PIER-sponsored research, development and demonstration (RD&D) has focused on development of integrated lighting systems for shared occupant spaces such as classrooms and conference rooms. These systems combine energy-efficient luminaires, multi-level scene control, occupancy sensors and daylight harvesting to create optimized lighting systems tailored for the modern learning space. 

SPEED Technologies

 SPEED Technologies
06/24/2013

The State Partnership for Energy Efficient Demonstrations (SPEED) program drives the market adoption of energy efficient technologies. Managed through the California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE), SPEED has conducted more than 100 demonstrations and other technology-transfer projects across the state, showcasing the benefits of best practices and state-of-the-art solutions.

UC Davis Smart Lighting Initiative: Lighting the Way to a Sustainable 2nd Century

05/01/2012

Lighting accounts for about a quarter of California’s electricity use, and installing energy-efficient lighting can lead to significant energy, maintenance, carbon, and economic savings, according to the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC). In September 2010, the CPUC adopted a plan to achieve a 60–80% reduction in statewide electrical lighting consumption by 2020.

Adaptive LED Post-top Luminaires, Los Angeles Trade Technical College

05/01/2012

In the summer of 2010 the California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC) and Philips Hadco produced an adaptive solution that combined a dimmable LED source and a mounting collar equipped with occupancy sensors. The collar provides 360-degree occupancy sensor coverage. This demonstration involved whole-head replacement of the existing luminaires, but results could also be achieved with a retrofit kit. The new luminaires feature good color quality, improved efficiency and a longer lifespan.

Adaptive Corridors at UC Davis

07/01/2011

A basic adaptive lighting system is composed of occupancy sensors, dimmable ballasts and sources, and a communication platform for the system components. By combining commercially-available components, multiple solutions may be implemented to deliver occupancy-based, adaptive corridor lighting. Three of these solutions were demonstrated and evaluated in corridor applications in a multi-use building at the University of California, Davis. 

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