Fluorescent

Adaptive Corridor Lighting, UC San Francisco

Adaptive Corridor Lighting Demonstration at UCSF
05/28/2014

In 2013 the SPEED team collaborated with UC San Francisco to demonstrate three lighting retrofits of fluorescent fixtures. Three control systems, each with different system architectures, were installed in three different UCSF corridors. All three systems utilize occupancy controls, but each one provides a different level of control, different programming capabilities, and energy and maintenance monitoring features. The demonstrations produced energy savings of 53–68%, based on occupancy rates of 12–16%.

LED Retrofit Options for Linear Fluorescent Luminaires

03/31/2014

Fluorescent lamps currently constitute 80 percent of lamps installed in the U.S. commercial sector, according to the Department of Energy's latest Lighting Market Characterization report. LED lighting products are receiving a great deal of attention for their potential to replace fluorescent lighting, reduce energy use and improve lighting quality in a variety of indoor commercial applications, including offices, classrooms and retail stores.

Residential Lighting: Title 24 and Technology Update

01/01/2008

These presentation slides cover best practices for residential lighting design. The material is designed to help builders meet, or exceed, California's 2008 Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards. It includes background and policy, common lighting terms and technology updates, guidance in residential lighting design, a step-by-step overview of the Title 24 compliance process, and additional resources.

Adaptive Corridors at UC Davis

07/01/2011

A basic adaptive lighting system is composed of occupancy sensors, dimmable ballasts and sources, and a communication platform for the system components. By combining commercially-available components, multiple solutions may be implemented to deliver occupancy-based, adaptive corridor lighting. Three of these solutions were demonstrated and evaluated in corridor applications in a multi-use building at the University of California, Davis. 

Adaptive Fluorescent Parking Garage Luminaires at UC Santa Barbara

04/01/2011

The California Energy Commission’s Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program funded the demonstration of bi-level fluorescent parking garage luminaires that combine mature fluorescent sources with occupancy-based dimming controls. The Philips Day-Brite Vaporlume fluorescent strip fixture, equipped with an optional occupancy sensor and step-dimming ballast, automatically reduces power consumption upon vacancy and increases to full power upon occupancy. Bi-level products may be combined with traditional photocontrols to maximize energy savings. 

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