Publications

Educational Video: 2019 Lighting Controls Acceptance Testing

11/30/2020

The California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC) at the University of California Davis collaborated with Southern California Edison, RMS Energy Consulting, LLC and the California Energy Commission to provide this educational video in support of the 2019 Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Title 24).  California’s new Building Energy Efficiency Standards took effect on January 1, 2020.

Educational Video: 2019 Lighting Alterations

11/30/2020

The California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC) at the University of California Davis collaborated with Southern California Edison, RMS Energy Consulting, LLC and the California Energy Commission to provide this educational video in support of the 2019 Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Title 24).  California’s new Building Energy Efficiency Standards took effect on January 1, 2020.

Educational Video: 2019 High-Efficacy Lighting for Residential Applications

11/30/2020

The California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC) at the University of California Davis collaborated with Southern California Edison, RMS Energy Consulting, LLC and the California Energy Commission to provide this educational video in support of the 2019 Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Title 24).  California’s new Building Energy Efficiency Standards took effect on January 1, 2020.

Educational Video: 2019 Lighting Controls Technologies & Requirements

11/30/2020

The California Lighting Technology Center (CLTC) at the University of California Davis collaborated with Southern California Edison, RMS Energy Consulting, LLC and the California Energy Commission to provide this educational video in support of the 2019 Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Title 24).  California’s new Building Energy Efficiency Standards took effect on January 1, 2020.

Laboratory Evaluation of DC Lighting Systems

08/04/2020

Historically, power distribution has been dominated by Alternating-Current (AC) which significantly influenced the design of connected energy-consuming appliances.  With the emergence of electronics and digital controls as standard design elements in almost all appliance categories, the need for Direct-Current (DC) has emerged, even as it opposes traditional distribution practices.  This issue is typically resolved at the appliance level with AC-to-DC converters. 

Nonresidential Lighting & Electrical Power Distribution Guide for 2019 Building Energy Efficiency Standards

04/07/2020

The California Lighting Technology Center’s Nonresidential Lighting and Electrical Power Distribution Guide assists builders and lighting industry professionals in navigating the nonresidential lighting and electrical power distribution portions of California’s Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Title 24, Part 6 or Energy Code). The 2019 iteration of the Energy Code took effect on January 1, 2020. 

Residential Lighting Guide for 2019 Building Energy Efficiency Standards

03/25/2020

The California Lighting Technology Center’s Residential Lighting Guide assists builders and lighting industry professionals in navigating the residential lighting portion of California’s Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Title 24, Part 6 or Energy Code). The 2019 iteration of the Energy Code took effect on January 1, 2020. 

LD+A Research Matters: Optimizing Building Design and Operations

CLTC Studies: Optimizing Building Design and Operations. A laboratory room within CLTC demonstrating various lighting and daylighting technologies and integrated building controls.
11/19/2019

Designers, owners and operators are all faced with a myriad of decisions on how best to achieve their building design and operational goals. Complex and often conflicting objectives can make even the simplest decisions appear challenging. Take, for example, thermal comfort. According to the Department of Energy, adjusting temperature set points by just one degree for an eight-hour workday can save commercial building owners 3% in energy costs. This equates to thousands of dollars in savings each year. Clearly, the least costly alternative is to not heat or cool a building.

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