Outdoor

Energy Code Lighting Language Cleanup Initiative

The California Lighting Technology Center, in collaboration with Southern California Edison, RMS Energy Consulting LLC, and the California Energy Alliance, are establishing a working group of industry stakeholders to help develop recommendations that will simplify and clarify the nonresidential lighting and lighting controls language contained in the 2022 Title 24, Part 6 Building Energy Efficiency Standards.

CLTC Publishes Study on Adaptive Lighting in Outdoor Security Applications

Published: Wed, 11/17/2021

Today, adaptive lighting is considered best practice for numerous outdoor applications and has been incorporated into many current energy standards. However, outdoor areas with heightened security requirements are often excluded from adaptive lighting control requirements and these areas remain lit with high, uniform levels of static illumination.

To address this gap, CLTC partnered with the Office of Naval Research to evaluate the energy-savings potential and end-user acceptance of adaptive lighting for outdoor security applications.

Adaptive Lighting in Outdoor Security Applications

11/16/2021
Today, adaptive lighting, which is lighting controlled by occupancy sensors or schedules that adjust light levels based on actual site conditions, is considered best practice for numerous outdoor applications. Adaptive lighting has been adopted as part of some commercial energy standards and the strategy is now included in many outdoor lighting specifications and design guides. Outdoor areas with heightened security requirements, however, are often excluded from adaptive lighting control requirements and these areas remain lit with high, uniform levels of static illumination.

Renewable Energy & Advanced Lighting Systems for Grid-Connected Exterior Applications

CLTC Studies Renewable Energy & Advanced Lighting Systems for Exterior Applications

Exterior lighting generally operates from early evening through early morning, a period of little to no renewable energy generation, which means this lighting is primarily powered by carbon-dense fossil fuels. Fossil fuel use is a significant contributor to greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), poor air quality, water pollution and land degradation. In addition, low-quality exterior lighting characterized by poor color, inappropriate light distribution, and inadequate light levels has also been linked to increased crime rates and reduced physical activity within the surrounding community.

2019 Title 24, Part 11 CALGreen Moves to 3,000 K for Select Outdoor Applications

Photo: International Dark-Sky Association (IDA)
10/05/2018

CLTC participated in the 2019 Title 24, Part 11 CALGreen code-development process to incorporate lower CCT standards for certain outdoor lighting applications. CLTC provided key testimony and support during public meetings in support of this specification.  Considerable scientific data currently exists indicating that light at night can be a significant issue in terms of circadian disruption leading to poor health and wellness outcomes.

CLTC Releases 2019 Nonresidential Lighting & Electrical Power Distribution Guide

Published: Fri, 04/03/2020

CLTC is excited to announce that our 2019 Nonresidential Lighting and Electrical Power Distribution Guide is now available!  The guide assists builders and lighting industry professionals in navigating the nonresidential lighting and electrical power distribution portions of California’s Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Title 24, Part 6 or Energy Code) that took effect on January 1, 2020. 

Nonresidential Lighting & Electrical Power Distribution Guide for 2019 Building Energy Efficiency Standards

04/07/2020

The California Lighting Technology Center’s Nonresidential Lighting and Electrical Power Distribution Guide assists builders and lighting industry professionals in navigating the nonresidential lighting and electrical power distribution portions of California’s Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Title 24, Part 6 or Energy Code). The 2019 iteration of the Energy Code took effect on January 1, 2020. 

Residential Lighting Guide for 2019 Building Energy Efficiency Standards

03/25/2020

The California Lighting Technology Center’s Residential Lighting Guide assists builders and lighting industry professionals in navigating the residential lighting portion of California’s Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Title 24, Part 6 or Energy Code). The 2019 iteration of the Energy Code took effect on January 1, 2020. 

Adaptive Sensor-Based Lighting for Security Applications

Traditional outdoor lighting technologies operate at full power throughout the night, even when areas are vacant.  This extra load, energy waste and light pollution can be averted by updating the lighting system with energy-efficient light sources and lighting controls.  By installing these technologies, adaptive lighting strategies can be implemented that provide the right amount of light when and where it is needed.  

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